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Fishing Site Dispute Resolution Protocol

With the number of fishers on the river, it isn’t uncommon for site disputes to occur. Often the first reaction fishers have is to contact CRITFC Enforcement, but this takes already limited resources off the river we’d rather use to focus on protecting the fishery resources. For this reason, CRITFC and the member tribes  developed a protocol for fishers to deal with site disputes that arise along the river. Hopefully you won’t have a reason to use them, but just in case, please acquaint yourself with these steps. (Click here for a printable version of these steps.)

  • STEP 1. Try to resolve the dispute directly with the other involved fishers. In many of the cases from the past few years, the disputing fishers hadn’t even spoken with one another before CRITFC Enforcement involvement.
  • STEP 2. If you cannot resolve a site dispute between yourselves, contact your tribe to get assistance. Provide them with the fishing site, all the fishers involved, and any other information that may help resolve the site dispute, such as site registration documents and maps.
    You should avoid taking matters into your own hands. Handling of another’s property may result in a tribal violation.
  • STEP 3. If your tribe does not act to resolve the dispute in a timely manner, contact CRITFC Enforcement (541-386-6363). A case report will not be initiated until Steps 1 and 2 are followed. Contact CRITFC Enforcement at any time if you are concerned for your personal safety or immediate loss of property.
  • STEP 4. Tribal law enforcement and CRITFE will attempt to help resolve the site dispute at the fishers’ level before escalating the issue for tribal action. Your cooperation will help make this outcome more likely. If, however, the resolution is not satisfactory to you, contact your tribe’s Fish and Wildlife Committee.
  • STEP 5. Abide by the decision of your tribe. Tribal law enforcement and CRITFC Enforcement have no authority to hear appeals to tribal decisions, they are merely there to enforce tribal law and decisions. If you would like to appeal a tribal ruling, direct it to your respective tribal officials and not tribal law enforcement and/or CRITFC Enforcement.

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