Currents

Honoring Oceans on World Oceans Day

Thanks to the heroic efforts and sacrifice of the salmon, people, animals, and plants hundreds of miles from the coast can take part in the richness that the ocean provides. On World Oceans Day, we honor the gifts that the oceans provide.

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Fish Counts

 

On Wednesday 10,620 sockeye passed Bonneville Dam. So far 276,491 have passed this year.

Current year | 10-year average
Graph shows entire run period.
Full fish counts »

Fish Counts at Dam

Sockeye Season Graph

Current year | Last year | 10-year average
Graph shows entire run period

Fish Counts for Wed, Jun 29

Sockeye10,620
276,49155.18178,169
  • Sat, 6/25
    • 16,466
  • Sun
    • 12,114
  • Mon
    • 12,999
  • Tue
    • 10,373
Summer Chinook3,042
211,9229.46193,611
  • Sat, 6/25
    • 2,909
  • Sun
    • 2,717
  • Mon
    • 2,585
  • Tue
    • 2,216
Steelhead741
14,1869.6912,933
  • Sat, 6/25
    • 514
  • Sun
    • 495
  • Mon
    • 552
  • Tue
    • 456
Coho0
0 equal to 10-yr avg0
  • Sat, 6/25
    • 0
  • Sun
    • 0
  • Mon
    • 0
  • Tue
    • 0

Tap species to see counts for previous four days.

Fish Passage Center logoData courtesy the Fish Passage Center. Count information generally updates the following morning depending on the dam and day of the week. CRITFC synchronizes data with the Fish Passage Center every 30 minutes to ensure these are the most current results. Weekend counts are typically posted on the following Monday.

Restoration Science

Hagerman Genetics Lab

CRITFC provides the tribes and the region with invaluable biological and ecological research, fisheries management, and other science to support the protection and restoration of Columbia River Basin salmon, lamprey, and sturgeon. The tribal vision is rebuild salmon, lamprey, and sturgeon populations to full productivity. Continue Reading »

Fishing Rights

Celilo Falls

In coordination with and under the direction of the member tribes, CRITFC’s team of lawyers, policy analysts, and fisheries enforcement officers work to ensure that tribal treaty rights are protected. We also work closely with state and federal agencies to ensure fair harvest sharing between the tribal and non-tribal fisheries. Continue Reading »

Climate Change

Salmon Camp NPT Hatchery.jpg

The sacred First Foods and the tribal cultures based on them are threatened by our changing climate. The tribes are working to prepare for the coming changes, including helping salmon in an altered climate with habitat projects designed to cool down tributaries and exploring alternative hydrosystem operations. Continue Reading »

To ensure a unified voice in the overall
management of the fishery resources, and as
managers, to protect reserved treaty rights
through the exercise of the inherent sovereign
powers of the tribes.

– CRITFC mission

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