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Currents

Fall Chinook Continue to Set Records on the Snake River

For the third year in a row, fall chinook returning to the Snake River have set a new record. Data released by the Nez Perce Tribe shows that a new record of 9,345 redds, or gravel nests, were built by returning adults in the Snake River Basin between Lower Granite... read more

2015 Review

 

2015 was filled with noteworthy events, milestones, and records from record-breaking salmon runs to tribal successes in restoration efforts. See our annual year in review page here.

Restoration Science

Hagerman Genetics Lab

CRITFC provides the tribes and the region with invaluable biological and ecological research, fisheries management, and other science to support the protection and restoration of Columbia River Basin salmon, lamprey, and sturgeon. The tribal vision is rebuild salmon, lamprey, and sturgeon populations to full productivity. Continue Reading »

Fishing Rights

Celilo Falls

In careful coordination with and under the director of the member tribes, CRITFC’s team of lawyers, policy analysts, and fisheries enforcement officers work to ensure that tribal treaty rights are protected. We also work closely with state and federal agencies to ensure fair harvest sharing between the tribal and non-tribal fisheries. Continue Reading »

Education

Salmon Camp NPT Hatchery.jpg

CRITFC seeks to educate the region on the tribal perspective on salmon and lamprey restoration, the nature of treaty fishing rights, and tribal salmon culture. By sharing the message that all residents of the Columbia River Basin are “Salmon People,” we hope to inspire others to help restore and honor the salmon. Continue Reading »

To ensure a unified voice in the overall
management of the fishery resources, and as
managers, to protect reserved treaty rights
through the exercise of the inherent sovereign
powers of the tribes.

– CRITFC mission

CRITFC on Facebook

The first commission meeting of 2016 just wrapped up and we had some great discussions on some of the many issues that we'll face. It was also the first commission meeting for new CRITFC Chairman Jeremy Wolf. Chairman Wolf is Vice Chair of the Board Trustees for the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation and stepped in for Kat Brigham in December. ... See MoreSee Less

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Debbie Huesties, Marsha Armstrong and 23 others like this

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Sally Carufel WilliamsAwesome

1 week ago
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Louis M. CaseCongratulations Jeremy ! ! !

1 week ago
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Clinton TomCongrats !!!

1 week ago
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Betty Van PeltMany issues-like??? What else. Who else. ???

1 week ago
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Sharon GoudyWho are the other officers?

1 week ago
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Peggy BronsonA great step in! Congratulations!

1 week ago   ·  1
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Charles L ScottCongratulations

1 week ago
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Deanna Jim-JuarezThe vice chair is Patrick Luke-Yakama, Carlos Smith - Warm Springs, Leotis McCormack - Nez Perce

1 week ago
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Brian R PattersonStrength&courage honor&integrity. It is now your moccasins on the path.

1 week ago
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Alanna NanegosThat's not an easy commission to lead. We (the four tribes) are very competitive and territorial. If ever there is an example of how all tribes are unique, our CRTIFC member Tribes are the perfect example. Think about talking up issues with folks who aren't at the table... Might bring something new. Congrats! I know you will take care of CTUIR interests.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Michael HaasCongratulations Sir, the very best to you, long live the River and its ecosystem and indigenous inhabitants and best wishes on the Umatilla that can use all the help you can provide and the Wallowa and the Clearwater and the Snake and all the others. Having worked for quite a few years at Bonneville providing interpretive services and becoming quite familiar with all the challenges of the multiple uses being applied upon the Great River of the West, I wish you so very well, Sir

1 week ago
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CRITFC for Kids

CRITFC for Kids

Visit our Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website just for kids to learn about salmon, healthy rivers, and the tribes through fun activities.

In the News

The federal hatcheries, along with others operated by the states, are mainly responsible for maintaining salmon runs now that the river system is dammed. A pending lawsuit by an environmental group is the latest challenge to federal salmon and steelhead hatcheries on the Columbia River, a decades-old system that has also faced some congressional scrutiny in recent years.

In what may be the first award of its kind, a federal judge has ordered the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to pay the Yakama Nation for past and future costs related to cleaning up a contaminated Columbia River island. The case focused on Bradford Island, a historical tribal fishing site where waste from Bonneville Dam was dumped for decades.

Six weeks ago, it looked as though a decade of negotiations on a water management plan for the Klamath River had led to nothing. Rep. Greg Walden, the Republican who represents the Oregon portion of the Klamath basin in the U.S.

Last week included one of the signature events on the Pacific Northwest's annual calendar: the setting of spring fishing seasons on the Columbia River. The forecast for the important spring Chinook run is about 300,000 to the river's mouth, about 28 percent fewer than last year but mor

Columbia River Salmon and Tribal News | Committee Discusses Restoration of Salmon Runs Above Grand Coulee Dam

Washington lawmakers held a committee meeting yesterday to hear testimony for a proposal that asks the federal government to support restoring salmon runs above Grand Coulee Dam. Salmon runs on the Upper Columbia River were halted by dam construction in the early 1940s.

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