Select Page

Monitoring Recovery Trends

To develop a quantitative means to evaluate current and potential spring Chinook salmon viability factors (productivity, abundance, spatial structure, diversity) for selected listed populations, focusing on key limiting habitat factors.

Grande Ronde River

The Grande Ronde River subbasin is one of the test basins for developing the monitoring protocols. Photo: Gary Halvorson

Project Goal

To develop a quantitative means to evaluate current and potential spring Chinook salmon viability factors (productivity, abundance, spatial structure, diversity) for selected listed populations, focusing on key limiting habitat factors.

Impacts

This project will provide information to develop more effective habitat restoration strategies by describing the effect of habitat conditions on fish production.

Background

NOAA adopted a method of calculation that simply averages all limiting factors as a means to gauge an overall percentage of potential function (i.e., productivity). This method is not amenable to providing realistic evaluations of habitat condition or restoration trends and their implications to salmon productivity. The tribes need more defensible methods that can provide more accurate assessments so that status and trends in habitat and viability can be meaningfully expressed in the next Accords review.

Project Tasks

  1. Collect LIDAR and FLIR data, which will allow us to accurately assess riparian vegetation and stream-side condition by remote sensing.
  2. Build a model for predicting longitudinal patterns of water temperature on any day, based on solar radiation, local riparian cover, and other meteorological conditions.
  3. Evaluate the spatial distribution of habitat conditions (water temperature, sediment, and flows) in the two test basins in order to integrate overall population productivity.
  4. Trends in key habitat conditions and related freshwater survival over time will be viewed as a result of aggregate restoration actions at a basin level.
  5. Measure juvenile chinook growth rates in relation to water temperature, food availability, riparian condition, and channel complexity measures.
  6. Review and evaluate habitat analysis methods, develop new methods, and examine statistical aspects of sampling.

Pin It on Pinterest