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Nez Perce Leader Quincy Ellenwood Sworn in as New CRITFC Chair

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Portland, OR- Nez Perce tribal leader Quincy Ellenwood was sworn in today as the 2021-2022 Chair of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission during its July meeting. Outgoing CRITFC Chair Jeremy Takala (Yakama) administered the oath of office.

“CRITFC’s four member tribes are united by many things, most significantly our deep cultural and spiritual connection to the land and the First Foods it provides, especially salmon,” said Chair Ellenwood. “These sacred fish face ever growing impacts from climate change and other threats to their ecosystem. And the fishers who depend on salmon face many health and economic impacts from the global pandemic. By working together in intertribal cooperation, it is my hope that we not only retain and enhance what we have, but also provide resiliency in all our tribal foods and cultural needs into the future. In working to provide for our people and our futures, I believe we honor the sacrifices and dedication of our elders and ancestors. It is truly an honor to serve in this role.”

Quincy is the son of the late Ruby Jackson and grandson of Charles Jackson, Sr. and Shirley Ellenwood. His Indian name is Tsi-Yo-Kum but his great-grandfather Gene Ellenwood called him Waawat, which mean “loves to fish.”

Quincy graduated from Lapwai High School in 1997 and studied Business at Lewis-Clark State College. He has served as a Nez Perce Tribe Fish & Wildlife commissioner and a CRITFC commissioner for over 10 years. “I had the honor of serving with the late Elmer Crow, Jr on the Fish & Wildlife Commission. He taught me ‘When you’re at the table working for the people, keep them in your heart and mind.’ That wisdom guides me in my service and will guide me in this new role as CRITFC Chair.”

Quincy is currently serving his fifth year as a member of the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee. He has also served two years on the Nez Perce Tribe Enterprise Board and two years on the Nez Perce Tribe Resolutions Committee to which he was elected at the age of 19.

In addition to protecting the salmon resource, he is also actively involved in the Interagency Bison Management Plan and has been an advocate for the Nez Perce hunting rights in the State of Montana.

Quincy resides on the Nez Perce Reservation in Lapwai, Idaho with his wife Janice Jack-Ellenwood. He has three daughters, Kimiwan, Loreal, and Leiloni, and two stepsons, Tristan and Anthony Spencer. He enjoys watching his children’s sport activities, UFC fights, BBQing and being outdoors. Quincy is an avid hunter and fisher and is an advocate of the water, natural resources, traditions, and language.

Outgoing CRITFC Chair Jeremy Takala remarked, “I look forward to continuing working together for the vision we carry out for our fisheries and treaty-reserved rights. Salmon and other culturally important fish face many hardships, including climate change which is altering Mother Nature herself. We must continue to fulfill the tribal vision of restoration, no matter the obstacles, for the sake of our fish runs and for all native aquatic life to prosper in our Columbia River system.”

The other CRITFC officers elected for the 2021-2022 term were Ron Suppah, Sr. (Warm Springs), vice-chair; Jeremy Red Star Wolf (Umatilla), secretary, and Jeremy Takala (Yakama), treasurer. The election of CRITFC officers takes place every June with the seats rotated among the four member tribes.


About CRITFC. The Portland-based Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission is the technical support and coordinating agency for fishery management policies of the Columbia River Basin’s four treaty tribes: the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Nez Perce Tribe.

CRITFC, formed in 1977, employs biologists, other scientists, public information specialists, policy analysts and administrators who work in fisheries research and analyses, advocacy, planning and coordination, harvest control and law enforcement.

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