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Looking Back; Looking Forward

Looking Back; Looking Forward

Our upcoming annual report includes a section looking back over CRITFC’s three and a half decades. While going through the list of accomplishments, I couldn’t help but look forward to some new challenges that await us. The toxic contamination in the waters of the...
Speaking for the Ecosystem

Speaking for the Ecosystem

In 1964, after 14 years of studies and 6 years of negotiations, the United States and Canada implemented the Columbia River Treaty. The two nations agreed to manage the river system under this treaty only for flood control and hydropower production. The tribes weren’t...
Tribal Restoration Efforts Paying Off

Tribal Restoration Efforts Paying Off

Back in the 1970s, salmon runs were declining so quickly that there was a real worry that they would go extinct in some areas. In 1980, only 470,000 salmon passed Bonneville Dam—and that’s adding up chinook, sockeye, and coho. In 1995, the tribes released the...
A New Treaty for a New Era

A New Treaty for a New Era

The Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada has been a hybrid of fears and profits since its ratification in 1964. Narrowly designed for flood control and optimized hydropower production, the treaty has locked in 1960s priorities that do not reflect...
Director’s Message: First Salmon

Director’s Message: First Salmon

Last month saw the start of the Columbia River First Salmon feasts of the year, first in Lyle, then in Celilo the following week. This year, the fish have been slow coming and there have been low numbers of ceremonial fish available for the feasts. Despite this,...
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